Rowe, Scott hope for new tourist attraction


By Kathleen Guill - kguill@civitasmedia.com



Annette Rowe and Jeanie Scott have started a business called Heritage Barn Quilts. This is one attached to a house, but they can be attached to almost anything.


Courtesy photos

Annette Rowe and Jeanie Scott have started a business called Heritage Barn Quilts. This is one attached to a wooden privacy fence, but they can be attached to almost anything.


Courtesy photos

Annette Rowe and Jeanie Scott have started a business called Heritage Barn Quilts. They will have a booth set up at the Arts and Action Festival Sept. 16.

The idea for their business came from a trip Scott took to Bonham, Texas.

“She [Scott] went to Bonham, Texas and discovered this wonderful barn quilt trail,” Rowe said.

A barn quilt trail is a series of painted wood or metal, hung or free standing, quilt-like squares installed at various locations along a given route. There are quilt trails in about 43 of the United States as well as several in Canadian provinces. To find trails in individual states visit http://barnquiltinfo.com/map-US.html.

The closest barn quilt trail to Tillman County is in Stephens County. Rowe and Scott would like to begin one in Tillman County. They have been painting the squares on wood and several of them are displayed around Frederick. They hope to have about 20 for sale at the Arts and Action Festival but they will also be taking orders for custom squares.

“The barn quilts are on the fence and the eaves of our house,” Scott said. “They all have names too, which is what’s really interesting about it.”

Each design has a name just like quilt designs.

“They’re actual quilt patterns,” Rowe said. “Ours are painted on plywood and then mounted on barns, houses, fences, decks, patios, bird houses; you name it, they’re everywhere.”

They come in a variety if sizes.

“They can be one foot by one foot, two by two, three by three, four by four, and even up to sizes big enough for the side of a barn,” Scott said. “They can just be huge. We’re going to have this booth, but what the chamber and the arts council were thrilled about was having a Tillman County Barn Quilt Trail.

“What that means is that the chamber will give names to the patterns or some patterns already have names, but the chamber will have a map of where the barn quilts can be found and it’s kind of like a scavenger hunt. We’re hoping people in Tillman County will be interested in putting these up. It’s really a tourist draw. Like the people who come for the Oyster Fry, this would be something new they could do while they’re here.”

Although Rowe and Scott are painting some existing patterns, they will take orders from people who want to customize their own pattern.

To see what the barn work quilts look like in person, visit the Arts and Action Festival Sept. 16 at the Court House Square.

Annette Rowe and Jeanie Scott have started a business called Heritage Barn Quilts. This is one attached to a house, but they can be attached to almost anything.
http://www.press-leader.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/web1_Barn-Quilts-6-.jpgAnnette Rowe and Jeanie Scott have started a business called Heritage Barn Quilts. This is one attached to a house, but they can be attached to almost anything. Courtesy photos

Annette Rowe and Jeanie Scott have started a business called Heritage Barn Quilts. This is one attached to a wooden privacy fence, but they can be attached to almost anything.
http://www.press-leader.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/web1_Barn-Quilts-7-.jpgAnnette Rowe and Jeanie Scott have started a business called Heritage Barn Quilts. This is one attached to a wooden privacy fence, but they can be attached to almost anything. Courtesy photos

By Kathleen Guill

kguill@civitasmedia.com

Reach Kathleen Guill at 580-379-0588, ext. 2602.

Reach Kathleen Guill at 580-379-0588, ext. 2602.

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